IL:signalIL

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Introduction

Documentation

Syntax

Autoexport from the XML-Schema for element IL:signalIL of railML® version 3.2
Documentation The signal is a track asset used to transmit information to the train driver represented by its optical appearance.
Subschema interlocking
Parents* signalsIL
Children any (0..*), assetName (0..*), belongsToOperationalPoint (0..1), designator (0..*), hasCommand (0..*), hasIndication (0..*), hasIndicator (0..*), hasRepeater (0..*), protectsBlockExit (0..*), refersTo (0..1)
Attributes:
  • releaseSpeed: Release speed in km/h from controlled braking curve. (optional; xs:decimal),

  • malfunctionSpeed: This constant indicates the maximum speed in km/h with which a train may travel past a failed signal. The malfunctioning signal cannot be opened. (optional; xs:decimal),

  • approachSpeed: The maximum speed in km/h with which a train can approach the signal. This matches the Ka of the previous (=upstream) signal or speed sign. This is suitable for defining the line speed profile. (optional; xs:decimal),

  • passingSpeed: Maximum speed in km/h beyond the signal. This is suitable for defining the line speed profile. (optional; xs:decimal),

  • releaseDelay: Time to elapse between receiving the revocation command and before route release. (optional; xs:duration),

  • function: Function of the signal for usage by the interlocking. This is in addition to signalType in infrastructure. (optional; xs:string; patterns: other:\w{2,})
Possible values:
  • blockInterface
  • lineInterface
  • group
  • main
  • repeater
  • distant
  • shunting
  • barrage
  • block
  • junction
  • exit
  • intermediateStop
  • intermediate
  • entry,

  • isVirtual: Often, users label signals virtual. A virtual signal can be a dummy-signal that is a software object in the interlocking but has no physical trackside presence. Such virtual signals can be useful for modelling speed steps; there need not be a physical signal but the interlocking enforces a different speed at the position of the virtual signal. The other way round, stand-alone boards that are not wired to the interlocking can be labelled virtual. Such stand-alone signals are of interest to simulations because when they affect driver behaviour thus influence train runs. (obligatory; xs:boolean),

  • callOnAspectTime: time for duration to show call-on aspect on this signal (optional; xs:duration),

  • sightDistance: The distance in metres the signal is visible in advance by the train driver. This might influence reaction times on changing aspects for simulation. (optional; xs:decimal),

  • elementNumber: element number for internal referencing in the engineering data (optional; xs:nonNegativeInteger),

  • id: unique identifier (optional; xs:string; patterns: (urn:uuid:)?[0-9a-fA-F]{8}-[0-9a-fA-F]{4}-[0-9a-fA-F]{4}-[0-9a-fA-F]{4}-[0-9a-fA-F]{12}|\{[0-9a-fA-F]{8}-[0-9a-fA-F]{4}-[0-9a-fA-F]{4}-[0-9a-fA-F]{4}-[0-9a-fA-F]{12}\})
*Notice:
Elements may have different parent elements. As a consequence they may be used in different contexts.
Please, consider this as well as a user of this wiki as when developing this documentation further.
Aspects that are only relevant with respect to one of several parents should be explained exclusively in the documentation of the respective parent element.

Autoexport from the XML-Schema for element IL:signalIL of railML® version 3.1
Documentation The signal is a track asset used to transmit information to the train driver represented by its optical appearance.
Subschema interlocking
Parents* signalsIL
Children any (0..*), designator (0..1), protectsBlockExit (0..1), refersTo (1..1)
Attributes:
  • releaseSpeed: Release speed in km/h from controlled braking curve. (optional; xs:decimal),

  • malfunctionSpeed: This constant indicates the maximum speed in km/h with which a train may travel past a failed signal. The malfunctioning signal cannot be opened. (optional; xs:decimal),

  • approachSpeed: The maximum speed in km/h with which a train can approach the signal. This matches the Ka of the previous (=upstream) signal or speed sign. This is suitable for defining the line speed profile. (optional; xs:decimal),

  • passingSpeed: Maximum speed in km/h beyond the signal. This is suitable for defining the line speed profile. (optional; xs:decimal),

  • releaseDelay: Time to elapse between receiving the revocation command and before route release. (optional; xs:duration),

  • function: Function of the signal for usage by the interlocking. This is in addition to signalType in infrastructure. (optional; xs:string; patterns: other:\w{2,})
Possible values:
  • main
  • repeater
  • distant
  • shunting
  • barrage
  • block
  • junction
  • exit
  • intermediateStop
  • intermediate
  • entry,

  • isVirtual: Often, users label signals virtual. A virtual signal can be a dummy-signal that is a software object in the interlocking but has no physical trackside presence. Such virtual signals can be useful for modelling speed steps; there need not be a physical signal but the interlocking enforces a different speed at the position of the virtual signal. The other way round, stand-alone boards that are not wired to the interlocking can be labelled virtual. Such stand-alone signals are of interest to simulations because when they affect driver behaviour thus influence train runs. (obligatory; xs:boolean),

  • callOnAspectTime: time for duration to show call-on aspect on this signal (optional; xs:duration),

  • sightDistance: The distance in metres the signal is visible in advance by the train driver. This might influence reaction times on changing aspects for simulation. (optional; xs:decimal),

  • id: unique identifier (optional; xs:ID; patterns: (urn:uuid:)?[0-9a-fA-F]{8}-[0-9a-fA-F]{4}-[0-9a-fA-F]{4}-[0-9a-fA-F]{4}-[0-9a-fA-F]{12}|\{[0-9a-fA-F]{8}-[0-9a-fA-F]{4}-[0-9a-fA-F]{4}-[0-9a-fA-F]{4}-[0-9a-fA-F]{12}\})
*Notice:
Elements may have different parent elements. As a consequence they may be used in different contexts.
Please, consider this as well as a user of this wiki as when developing this documentation further.
Aspects that are only relevant with respect to one of several parents should be explained exclusively in the documentation of the respective parent element.

Semantics

Best Practice / Examples

Signals are used to transmit information from trackside to the train and its driver. They are protecting the train movements. Depending on the signal type they give allowance for movements or prohibit them and indicate acceptable speed for the movement for tracks in advance of it. The physical characteristics are included in the infrastructure part. Thus, the more functional features are part of the interlocking subschema. In order to avoid ambiguity with the infrastructure element the related type is called signalIL in railML interlocking subschema.

  • @isVirtual – There are two ways of having a virtual signal. First a virtual signal can be a dummy-signal that is a software object in the interlocking but has no physical trackside presence. Such virtual signals can be useful for modelling speed steps; there need not be a physical signal but the interlocking enforces a different speed at the position of the virtual signal. Such signals are set as virtual in infrastructure signalIS @isVirtual, as well.The other way round, stand-alone boards (e.g. marker boards of ETCS) that are not wired to the interlocking shall be labelled virtual in interlocking subschema, if the interlocking is using them with different aspects. They are virtually switched by the interlocking. Although they have a physical representation on track side, the transmitted information to the driver is not included in this representation. However, they also affect the train movements.
  • @releaseSpeed – Release speed in km/h from controlled braking curve. A release speed is a speed limit under which the train is allowed to run towards this signal, when the target speed is zero. This release speed is independent of any associated overlap or danger point, i.e. the minimum speed in case of different possibilities.
  • @malfunctionSpeed – This constant indicates the maximum speed in km/h with which a train may travel past a failed signal. The malfunctioning signal cannot be opened with normal proceed aspect.
  • @approachSpeed – The maximum speed in km/h with which a train can approach the signal independent of the aspect it is shown. This matches the Ka of the previous (=upstream) signal or speed sign. This is suitable for defining the line speed profile.
  • @passingSpeed – Maximum speed in km/h beyond the signal independent of the aspect it is shown. This is suitable for defining the line speed profile.
  • @releaseDelayTimer – This is the time to elapse between receiving the revocation command and before route release.
  • @function – This is the function of the signal in the interlocking context. Just specifying the main purpose like main, distant or shunting signal only is not the right information for the interlocking. A more detailed differentiation including the main purpose is necessary to define the handling of the particular signal in general, i.e. not only considering the use within routes. There are the following functions possible:
    • barrage – The barrage signal is a special protection signal. In most cases it is not really a main signal. Examples are the extra protection of level crossings or the case of the destination (berthing) track in a station, when it is divided in two parts, to protect the first train from the following one entering this track.
    • block – The block signal is used on open line at the start of a block route.
    • entry – The entry signal is the main signal protecting the entrance of a station from the open line.
    • exit – The exit signal is the start of a route from within a station onto the open line.
    • distant – The distant signal is announcing the actual aspect of the related main signal. It is positioned in the normal braking distance in rear of the related main signal.
    • intermediate – The intermediate signal is a main signal within a station neither used for entry nor exit routes.
    • intermediateStop – This is a special intermediate signal that is used for marking the stopping place. It is used with long berthing tracks in station where the platform is not close to the exit signal.
    • junction – The junction signal is used within several routes that start not at a main signal as the common main signal. This signal is typically used for exits from a yard where the individual tracks have shunting signals only.
    • main – The main signal is a normal signal for train traffic protection which is neither used as block, entry, exit nor intermediate signal. This is the more general function in case no specific one can be used.
    • repeater – The repeater signal just repeats the aspect of the related signal. Dependent on the IM the related signal can be of different type like main, distant or shunting signal.
    • shunting – The shunting signal is mainly used in routes for shunting purpose or as indicator for local operation modus. Sometimes the shunting signal is included as intermediate signal in normal train routes.
    • other:… – The signal function is none of the already defined ones. This is the optional extension of the list. Each entry needs to start with the string “other:” and shall have at least two letters in addition.
  • @callOnAspectTime – This is the time value for setting the duration of an active call-on aspect at this signal.
  • @sightDistance – This is the distance in metres the signal is visible in advance by the train driver. The value may affect the reaction times on changing aspects in operation simulation.
  • <refersTo> – This is the reference to the physical signal <signalIS> in the infrastructure.
  • <protectsBlockExit> – This is the reference to train detection device at the border between station and open line, when the signal is protecting the exit from open line, i.e. the block exit or station entry.


It has to be noted that the data given in <signalIL> do only reflect characteristics of the signal in general but are not bound to a particular route. The dynamic signal information related to a particular route is defined in signalPlan.

The first extract shows a marker board which is used as virtual exit signal from the station.

<signalIL id="mb_sig01" isVirtual="true" releaseSpeed="0" malfunctionSpeed="0" approachSpeed="0" passingSpeed="0" releaseDelay="PT5S" function="exit">
        <designator register="_SimpleRegister" entry="Arnau 68N2"/>
        <refersTo ref="sig01" />
</signalIL>

This extract shows a conventional light signal, which is not virtual and located at the station entry.

<signalIL id="ls_sig04" isVirtual="false" releaseSpeed="0" malfunctionSpeed="0" approachSpeed="0" passingSpeed="0" releaseDelay="PT5S" function="entry" callOnAspectTime="PT90S">
        <designator register="_SimpleRegister" entry="Cstadt 69A"/>
        <refersTo ref="sig04" />
</signalIL>

Additional Information

Notes

Open Issues